Homecoming to a tragedy, 1898

Few photographs exist of Frances Harriet Ruddy, neé Williams. This is apparently taken when she was a young woman.

As mentioned in my previous post, Thomas had hardly ever, perhaps never been away overnight from his family since his marriage to Frances Harriet. The events that were to unfold on his return were therefore particularly shocking.

I got home here to find poor Frances looking quite ill with what we thought was severe bilious attack.  She was very sorry to be ill on my arrival home, for she would have liked to hear all about my visit if well enough.

Tuesday the 26th.  I got the doctor (Mr Williams) to come and see Frances. He said she had a chill and inflammation, so she had better keep to bed for a day or two, and that she would be alright in a few days.

Wednesday the 27th. Francis fairly well. I at Pen. [Home of Mr Pamplin, Frances’uncle]  Frances weak on Thursday. 

Friday. Henry had his report to say he had passed in the first division the Matriculation Exam of the University of Wales.  His mother was much pleased and complimented him. Willie came in the evening for his holidays; he had a week, most of which he spent in the Isle of Man.

Saturday the 30th. Francis apparently better. Dr here every day at my wish, because it is more satisfactory.

The 31st. Dear Frances pretty well until the evening when she became delirious. She had great thirst the previous night; I gave her milk and soda water frequently, and champagne occasionally.

Monday, August 1. Dear Frances delirious all night, and dreadfully exhausted in the morning. When the doctor came he discovered that there was an internal rupture of the stomach; this was terribly sad news for me, for he held out no hope of recovery. It was a fearful shock to all of us, and God took her from us at a 12:45 o’clock midday. She was quite unconscious, and died with the bright smile on her face. Mrs Cleveley the Coachman’s wife and Mrs Davies who washes for us were with her all the morning until she died. We were all suddenly plunged in deep sorrow, a sorrow which never can be forgotten. My dear wife was a most devoted mother to her children and a wife who could scarcely be equalled in her sphere of life. She is well and truthfully described in Proverbs, chapter 31 , verses 27 and 28.

Frances sang as part of her Uncle William Pamplin’s choir ‘Sacred Melodies’. She is probably standing extreme right (unconfirmed)

Willie returned to his work in the evening. Mrs Cleveley kindly made room for the two boys, Henry and Alfred to sleep at her house, and I slept or tried to sleep in their room. We had a sad house.

So, with terrible suddenness, Thomas became a widower for a second time, leaving the children of their marriage: Henry, 16, Frances Harriet (Francie) 14, Caroline Elizabeth (Carrie) 13, Amelia Agnes (Millie) 11 and Alfred Williams (Alfie) 8.

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